FAQ

Isn’t kayaking the Inside Passage dangerous?
What type of ______ equipment are you taking?
How can you afford to do a trip like this?
How do I schedule a presentation?
What are the issues that face wild salmon?
What is Salmon Farming?
What other animals are affected by open-net salmon farming?
But, I thought farmed salmon was more sustainable, taking pressure off of wild salmon populations?
How do I make a donation to research and protection for the salmon?
I want to contribute without making a donation, how can I?
What are possible solutions to salmon farming problems?

Questions about the Trip…


Isn’t kayaking the Inside Passage dangerous?

The primary risks are open crossings, weather, cold water, and bears.  We’re taking all precautions to make the passage as safe as possible by choosing the appropriate clothing, equipment, and electronics.  Click here to check out our gear choices.

What type of ______ equipment are you taking?

Please check our Inside Passage “Go Wild” gear page for detailed information.

How can you afford to do a trip like this?
This is probably the most common question we get.  We are not trust fund babies or otherwise independently wealthy.  We don’t have financial sponsors – all donations benefit Living Oceans Society.  Throughout the last 5 years, we have looked for opportunities to create”passive” income and have sought jobs that allow us the flexibility for travel and adventure.  We are passionate about travel, the environment, and the outdoors and have designed our spending habits and chosen our careers to allow us a flexible lifestyle.

Defining Our Goals: Most people look at their income and determine if they can afford to do something or buy something (a trip, a new pair of shoes, etc) based on their income.  We do the opposite.  We first consider what our goals are (aka. what we want to spend money on) and then create the income necessary to make it happen (plus a little cushion).  We have long-term goals and short-term goals.  These are written down and broken into categories based on cost, technical and physical experience needed, time commitment, etc.

Strategic Career Choices: A self-employed web developer, Apryle has built her business to include a team of reliable professional contractors who will seamlessly manage the business while she is traveling.  Phil works a day-job as a mortgage broker, which is a slow industry here in the United States currently.  His boss, and also the business owner, at Home Financial of the Rockies understands and supports Phil’s travel goals, to which we are very thankful and fortunate.

Strategic Investments:Our first home purchase was a conservative choice, with the right location and size for the perfect summer vacation rental in Estes Park.   With the help of a property manager, we will rent our place out short-term over the summer months while we are traveling and enjoy the quiet, small-town feel of Estes Park during the winters.

When a bank-owned property appeared in Estes that we couldn’t pass up, we stretched to purchase our first investment property.  Phil has done many of the renovations on the triplex himself, during slow times with the mortgage business.  He had no prior construction experience, so it was an educational experience and we’re thankful for all of the help we had along the way.  This property is more suited for long-term rentals and we already have 1 of the 3 units filled with a great tenant!  We are proud to say that this property was remodeled using recycled building materials whenever possible, saving us money and contributing less to landfills.

Strategic Saving: We have a list, not a physical written list, more of one in our heads, of things that are worth spending money on in comparison to other things we could spend that money on.  Before we spend money, we ask ourselves, “Is this worth working __ hours for?” or, “Would I rather have this now, or skip this for 1 month and have enough money for a plane ticket to ____?”  For most people, if you add up the money they spend going to restaurants/bars/coffee shops, they would have a plane ticket in a month or two.  For us, travel, adventure, and the environment are a higher priority than day-to-day spending.

How do I schedule a presentation?

We are available to speak on the following topics:

Professional~ Website Design, Search Engine Optimization, Financial Planning to Meet your Goals, Planning for Retirement, Risk-Taking, Setting and Reaching Goals, Leadership and Followership

Outdoors/Travel~ China: Culture, Food, Language & Scenery; Patagonia; Outdoor Leadership and Followership; Organizing an Expedition, Setting and Reaching Goals

We are available for businesses, schools, organizations, and associations.  Please send an email to philandapryle [at] elevatedattitude [.] com and let us know what you’re interested in and the date(s) you want to schedule.  As you know, we’re happy to travel for presentations. 😉

Questions about Salmon Farming…

What are the issues that face wild salmon?

The most pressing issue is open-net salmon farming.  As stated by Living Oceans Society,

“Salmon farms harm the environment by spreading diseases and parasites to wild fish, releasing waste and chemicals into the ocean, not being able to prevent farmed fish escapes and causing marine mammal deaths.”

These wastes and parasites include but are not limited to sea lice which are usually fatal to baby salmon, and fish excrement.

What is Salmon Farming?

Salmon farming is the practice of growing large numbers of hatchery-origin salmon for human food in large floating mesh net-cage pens located in sheltered bays along the coast.

What other animals are affected by open-net salmon farming?

The entire coastal ecosystem is threatened by declining salmon populations.  By feeding in the open ocean and then migrating to the place of their hatching, salmon transfer nutrients inland from the sea.  Along the way, they provide food for birds and land carnivores and after spawning, the salmon die, providing nutrients for the flora. 

Marine Mammals: Fish farms are fatal for other creatures too. The open net-cages attract predators like sea lions and dolphins that drown in the farms’ nets. Many salmon farms are licensed to shoot mammals that may threaten their stock. The pens of fish attract mammal predators that drown when caught in the nets or can be shot by fish farmers.

Land Mammals: Coastal carnivores depend heavily on salmon.  Grizzly bears in the Broughton Archipelago are starving due to collapsing pink salmon runs.

Other Fish: Raising carnivorous fish like salmon that need wild fish in their feed also impacts the marine environment. More wild fish are used to raise farmed salmon than the amount of farmed salmon produced. Salmon farming is reducing the global supply of wild fish.

But, I thought farmed salmon was more sustainable, taking pressure off of wild salmon populations?

Salmon farmers often claim their industry is helping to “feed the world.” In truth, the salmon farming industry accelerates the depletion of wild fish stocks and strains the food supply for people in poorer nations. On average, it takes three to five kilograms of wild fish (used in the feed) to produce one kilogram of farmed salmon. Most of the wild feed for B.C. farmed salmon is taken from the southern hemisphere, diverting local protein to raise a luxury product for northern consumers.

Farmed salmon also pose a threat to wild stocks by transferring parasites and diseases to passing wild salmon stocks. The open net-cages used in salmon farming do not allow disease and parasites to be contained, and a growing body of research has documented the decline of wild salmon stocks near salmon farms. Eating farmed salmon does not save wild salmon, it places them more at risk.

~ Living Oceans Society

How do I make a donation to research and protection for the salmon?

Thanks for asking… please click here to donate and help save wild salmon.

I want to contribute without making a donation, how can I?

Click here to view petitions to protect salmon.

Use your consumer power!

Don’t buy it if it’s farmed. At restaurants, ask if salmon is wild or farmed.

Don’t buy Atlantic salmon. If you see Atlantic salmon on a menu or a supermarket shelf, it is farmed.  According to Living Oceans Society, “there are no commercially viable Atlantic salmon fisheries left in North America.”

Buy canned salmon with confidence. According to Living Oceans Society, “Salmon used in canning is primarily wild salmon, although some can be farmed. The label on the can usually name the species of salmon– pink and sockeye are the most common canned salmons. Neither of these species are farmed so you can enjoy your canned salmon with confidence.”

Carry and pass out SeaChoice or Seafood Watch cards.

Volunteer your time.

Educate others.

What are the solutions to salmon farming problems?

  • Separate wild and farmed fish.
  • Remove open net-cage salmon farms from the B.C. coast and rapidly transition to land or ocean based closed containment systems.
  • No new open net-cage farm sites in British Columbia.
  • Until the transition to closed containment is complete, provide safe migration routes for juvenile salmon via the emptying of farms along these routes.
  • No increase in production levels at current farm sites.
  • Fish meal and fish oils used in farm fish feed must be harvested from verified sustainable sources.

~ Living Oceans Society

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